10 Tips for Tennis

Tennis is more accessible than many people think and is a fun way to get some of your 150 minutes of weekly physical activity.

Wimbledon may be over for another year, but if you’re feeling inspired, why not join in the tennis fever yourself? At this time of year you can play outside and enjoy the British summertime, while helping keep your heart healthy. It’s a great aerobic activity, as it gets your arm and leg muscles moving, but also allows rests between sets and games.

Make sure you find a partner with a similar level of fitness to get maximum enjoyment from the sport and avoid over-exerting yourself. Playing a doubles game is also a great way to involve the whole family. Here are our top tips for getting started.

  1. Holding court

Image result for Holding court in tennis

With more than enough public tennis courts, there may be a free one near you. The Lawn Tennis Association (LTA),  has an online search tool at All play tennis that lets you filter out ones that charge. . The charity Tennis for Free has an online database of tennis courts that don’t charge. It even offers free coaching in the country.

If you don’t typically play well the first 15 minutes of a match, you may want to consider stretching—or stretching more—beforehand. Whether this means taking up static stretching, or holding a pose for a short period of time, or dynamic stretching where you loosen up by moving through specific exercises, just do something.

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Holding Court

Picture Courtesy:  auremar

  2. Play the momentum of the match

Image result for Play the momentum of the match in tennis

Losing by a few points to that guy in the club you normally kill on court? Adjust your momentum. A lot of amateurs will lose two points and try to rush to get back. But then they’re less organized and more panicky. Take the full 20 seconds you have between points to gather yourself. Take a deep breath. On the other hand, if you’re racking up points on your serve, you should work to try to keep up that impetus. If you’re winning two points in a row, you have some momentum and you can play quicker.

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Creating Momentum 

 Picture Courtesy: CharlestonToday

3. Find a match

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Ask friends, family members and colleagues if they want to play. Setting a regular match or practice time can help you motivate one another. Tennis can also be a great way to meet new people. Websites such as Tennis Partner and Let’s Play Tennis offer an easy way to search for other solo players seeking someone to play with or against.  On the other hand, if you’re racking up points on your serve, you should work to try to keep up that impetus. If you’re winning two points in a row, you have some momentum and you can play quicker.

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 Tennis partner

Picture Courtesy: Lob and Smash 

  4. Join the club

Tennis

If you plan on playing regularly, you may want to join a tennis club. Becoming a member can provide easy access to partners, leagues and coaches. Other benefits may include changing and showering facilities, and courts with different surfaces to suit all weathers.

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join a tennis club

Picture Courtesy: WKU Tennis Club

  5. Find an instructor

Image result for . Find an instructor in tennis

Looking to improve your game? The LTA is, again, a good place to start. It gives advice on what to look for in a good coach and has an online search tool to find one near you. It also has information on tennis coaching for people with a disability. The average price of private coaching is about 1600 INR per hour.

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Tennis Coaches 

Picture Courtesy:Optimum Tennis 

  6. Play by the rules

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There are three stages of scoring in tennis: game, set and match. Four points win a game. Six games win a set. Two sets (out of three for women) or three sets (out of five for men) win a match. But first, you need to know how to win those first four points. You get a point if your opponent lets the ball bounce more than once before returning it, returns it outside the court, or fails to return it at all. The first point is called 15, the next 30, the third 40 and the fourth wins the game. If both players are on 40, the next point earns advantage and requires a consecutive point to then win the game.

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Basic rules of tennis

 Picture Courtesy: Smashing Aces Tennis 

7. YouTube yourself

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At the very least, get a buddy to shoot some video of you on court with your smartphone. When you watch the clip, you’ll probably be surprised by how many aspects you can pick up on in your play that should be modified or changed. There are several things amateurs can see with an untrained eye. It can help them realize certain things, like they’re standing in the wrong place or hitting [shots] too deep or too short.

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Practice By Yourself

 Picture Courtesy: YouTube

8. Pull back on your serve speed

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The serve is the most important shot in tennis, but that doesn’t mean you should wail on the ball at all cost to the rest of your game. I feel like amateurs try to go out and hit serves as hard as they can, at 100 percent velocity. But pros go after 80 percent [speed] and placement. They set up their first shot. Amateurs should focus on accuracy during their serves, considering any extra speed or spin as added bonuses.

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Tennis Serve Speed

Picture Courtesy: Feel Tennis

9. Stretch

Image result for Stretch in tennis

If you don’t typically play well the first 15 minutes of a match, you may want to consider stretching—or stretching more—beforehand. Whether this means taking up static stretching, or holding a pose for a short period of time, or dynamic stretching where you loosen up by moving through specific exercises, just do something, says Little.

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Tennis Stretches 

 Picture Courtesy: Stretching posters

10. A volley of health benefits

Image result for A volley of health benefits in tennis

Whether you’re playing a full-length match or having a friendly rally, tennis gets your whole body moving. It’s an aerobic activity, so playing at a moderate intensity can help improve your heart health. Controlling the racket is not just good for your arms – it engages core muscles and those in your shoulders and back.

Running to reach the  ball is great for your legs, and changing direction quickly develops balance and core strength. Wielding the racket and focusing on the flying ball is great for your hand-eye coordination and may sharpen your reflexes too.

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Fit with Tennis

Picture Courtesy: Wondrlust

Featured Picture Courtesy: Ritzman 

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